2017 Sundance PSA Project Behind-The-Scenes

Here’s some behind-the-scenes photos of our 2017 Sundance PSA! Photos by Suzan Jones.

2016 in Review: Thank You!

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2017 has begun with a bang for us. I’m thrilled and grateful for that. But this post, even though it’s the middle of January already, is for last year. 2016, I thank you for everything you gave to us. The many excellent projects, the happy clients, and even the occasional stumbling blocks- thank you. It’s all a learning experience, and I am grateful to everyone who was a part of our year.

In 2016 we laid the groundwork for some Continue reading

New TV Commercial Productions for Westside Rentals

I’m really excited about the work we did for this Los Angeles client, the TV commercials turned out great in every way. And what’s best is, they’re being seen and they are working for the client’s business. Yay! They’ll be playing all over Southern California through 2017.

One thing new directors and filmmakers don’t often understand is the amount of work it takes to get something that looks and feels natural and easy. The truth is, “easy” take a lot of work to get right. And I’m super-proud that we got it right.

We shot these on SONY, and colored in DaVinci. For more TV and web commercials, plus our corporate work, check out our website.

Finally, a 4K Deliverable


I’ve been shooting in 4K+ since 2007/2008. But the truth is, outside of film festival stuff, it’s been too unwieldy to deliver 4K masters to clients. I’m happy to say, that’s changed. Here’s our latest, a UHD agency cut of a spot we did in New York last month. It’s not 100% UHD- we have to redo the VFX in a couple of shots, and tweak a couple of things before it’s final. But wow, the detail’s awesome! In fact, for trademark reasons we’ll need to now add a couple of other VFX shots to this spot to obscure now-visible-in-4K details.

Over the next few months, I’ll be re-uploading more from our catalog in 4K/UHD.

Reflections on Video Production: Los Angeles vs New York

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I just finished a Los Angeles video production for a client. It was a blast, as usual, but I can’t talk about it just yet. Instead, today I’ve been reflecting on the differences and similarities between making a film or commercial in New York versus Los Angeles.

What I love about making videos in Los Angeles:

  • The weather, it’s almost always sunnyish.
  • I like getting in my truck and being able to pick up stuff from the rental house easily. I tend to rent “big stuff” in LA. But then, I have to, because it’s almost always sunny in LA (it’s a pro and a con).
  • The actors and crew are fantastic, in Los Angeles.
  • LA can look like almost anywhere in the world, for locations.

What I love about doing it in New York:

  • You can shoot on the street without being arrested or needing a permit, unless you bring big stuff and stop traffic.
  • New York looks… well, it looks amazing. There is no other place that looks like New York, and it is glorious (that’s a pro and a con).
  • The actors and crew are fantastic, in New York.
  • The subways are really efficient if you can be super-light. This doesn’t work for many jobs, but sometimes- especially for corporate videos- it can.

I work and live in both places. LA is Hollywood, and New York is Madison Avenue and Wall Street. Both are relevant. I think the nature of the industry is such that if you want to be successful you need to be in both places, depending on your craft. Certainly being solidly on both coasts has helped my business.

Yet, I still end up on planes to other places frequently. Because clients come from all over the world, and you must go where the work is. But that’s a story for another day.

Video Marketing for Startups, Tech-or-Otherwise

Image from the inimitable Robert

Image from the inimitable Robert

My agency has been lucky enough to have created videos for some truly exciting startups- myLanguage, with their Vocre app that won TechCrunch, being one of them. As I’ve worked with startups to tell their stories, I’ve learned a few things. And today I’ll share some of that hard-won knowledge with you.

Production Quality Still Matters

First, your video’s production quality still matters, even if you’re a startup. You cannot expect the public to put your video in context (“Hey! We’re a startup! Cut us some slack!”). People don’t care what your video’s budget was. They don’t care if you had to produce it under tremendous pressure. They’ll just judge the video- and your product/service- like they judge any video marketing. Meaning your competition these days is TV. Does your video look like it could be played on TV?

You Never Know Who Will See It

You never know who’s going to see your video. Yes, it’s important to try and figure out to whom your video should appeal- to figure out your audience. But a lot of the time, despite all the hard work you put in to define your audience, you won’t be able to account for every possibility. It’s in the nature of video marketing that your video will be shared and seen by audiences you may not have expected.

I learned this on our first promo video for Vocre, when the app became so insanely successful that for a few days local news throughout the USA and Canada played clips from our little promo video on the nightly news. Wow! Imagine my surprise, seeing our little video on screens that connected to millions of North Americans. Luckily, we put a lot of love and effort into the video.

Be Realistic With Your Budget

I get approached all the time by startups who tell me they want to shoot in midtown Manhattan or Beverly Hills, and they want 10 actors and 5 locations in their videos. And their budget is $3,000. Seriously, I get these calls and emails almost every day from well-intentioned CMOs and Marketing Managers.

You have to be realistic with your video. If you don’t have $50,000+ to make your promo, you need your video agency to find ways to creatively tell your story, within financial constraints. That’s OK, we do it ALL THE TIME. But… ditch the Cecil B. DeMille, Old-Hollywood ideas. You cannot have a cast of thousands and locations around the world, if you’re on a budget.

Remember, Story Trumps Everything

Here’s the biggest secret of all: even if you’re a well-funded startup willing to spend $100K+ on your video (we love you guys), if your story sucks the video will fail. I always get leery when a company approaches us with a fully-realized script, and “just” wants us to execute their vision. Those projects invariably fail.

No matter your budget, your video’s story is paramount: it has to grab your audience, and get them to take time from their busy day to learn more about you, and possibly even purchase your app/product/service. That’s a tall order.

Even if you’re a super-awesome marketing whiz,  you need a creative agency that truly understands video storytelling. Not merely a video production company. You need a partner who can work with your concepts and ideas, and make them better. Before the cameras start rolling. A partner who can make the most of what you have, budget and resource-wise, and help you come up with a story that truly engages your audience and incites them to take action.


Me-BlogPatrick is the founder of Los Angeles and New York City based PatrickOrtman, Inc., a creative video agency that has won a ton of ADDY and Telly awards, worked with 9 Fortune 500s (and tons of startups), and been featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, Toronto Star, USA Today, and many other print and online publications in the advertising and other industries.

The Skinny on Camera Formats: Raw, ProRes, H264, and Why It Matters for Your Commercial or Video

Why should you, as a business owner, chief marketing officer, or advertising agency creative care about what format your TV commercial, promotional video, or company/corporate video is shot on? I mean, video’s video, right?

Nope.

You’ll find a few flavors of video formats out there that video production companies and video agencies use to capture the footage for your videos. From highest to lowest quality, they are:

  • Raw
  • ProRes with a log or flat profile
  • H264 (what most DSLRs use)

Among these three types of footage, there’s a lot of sub-types. But that’s for another day. Let’s talk about when and why you’d choose any of these options, starting with the worst choice.

The worst choice of video format is H264, which is used by most DSLRs.

H264 is a very heavily-compressed format. This means you cannot push the image in post-production very much, without the image falling apart. Why is this bad? Because a vital part of making a commercial or video look like it’s a huge-budgeted national-quality spot is the magic we add in post-production.  The color-grading. The finishing. When you try to really dive in with H264 video and polish it, you can only do so much. And that sucks.

A step up is ProRes with a log profile. ProRes is a higher-quality video format that a lot of professional cameras and recording devices can capture in, today. It’s a professional-level format. You can do a lot with this footage, because it’s not so heavily compressed like H264. And if it’s captured in log format (an article for another day), you get reasonable flexibility in post-production. A lot of your local news, and some national spots are done in ProRes.

The best quality is Raw. There’s lots of types of Raw, but for today we’ll talk about the kind of Raw that the RED Digital Cinema cameras and Arri Alexa cameras can deliver. These are the platinum standard in the production world, and these two cameras are responsible for most of the national TV commercials, TV shows, and feature films that you see. Professionals choose these cameras and Raw format when they can, because it means you get tremendous flexibility in post-production to polish the look of your video.

There’s a time and place for every tool in the toolbox. Wanna guess which one we use the most? Raw, of course.

 

Getting In Early

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(This picture has nothing to do with this post, it’s just a frame from my NYC RED Dragon, and I like it)

I’ve always been the guy who gets in early. I had a real paper route when I was in grade school. I’d get up at 4:30am, get the papers delivered, feed the animals, and go to school. I enjoyed getting in early, because it meant by the time everyone else was moving around, I had a pretty good handle on what I’d have to do for the day, and I felt accomplished and prepared.

I’m the same way today, both personally and with client projects. Even for the most pedestrian-seeming corporate video, I like to get in early. I like to learn about the client, and what makes them tick. I like to learn about their business sector, and competition. I love learning about context and the world in which this video project will live or die.

After I’ve learned as much as I can, I can’t help but start thinking about ways I can help these clients tell their stories in the best way possible- that is, in ways that get results.

I encourage everyone on my team to think and act like this. Yes, it demands a lot more effort to get involved so early. But the rewards are tremendous for our clients, and, usually, for us.

 

 

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Giving Thanks To My Awesome Crew

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I work with two of the best film crews, ever. One in Los Angeles, and one in New York, with some swing members that go between the coasts, and a couple of hardy souls who travel all over the world with me on assignment.

Over the years, I’ve been lucky enough to work with this fantastic group of men and women who are more than hard-working: they are consummate pros, loyal, passionate about their crafts, and they always work for the good of the project- not their egos. It doesn’t matter if we’re doing a film, a tv commercial, or a corporate video: they always bring their “A” game.

These people are not merely my friends- they’re family. They don’t get the spotlight as much as the actors, or even as much as me. But they’re always there, kicking ass. And I am grateful. In no particular order, thank you Aaron (happy birthday!), Matt, Greg, Ernest, Gabriela, Laura, Rai, Nate, Crystal, Johnny, Anna, Katie, Tom (congrats on that Oscar nomination!), Jen, Martin, David, Andy, Jessica, Joshannes, Griff, Lani, Alex, Chad, and Jason.

We’re gonna keep kicking ass in 2015.

 

 

NYC Film Production Adventures

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I feel bad. I really let the blog slide for awhile. Well, I’ve had my reasons. And one is a new short film I directed in New York City. It’s called “New York Love Story”, and it’s about a woman coming to terms with a breakup, and the city of NY showing her that the possibilities of life are truly limitless.

This is my first writer-director-producer film since “Unlaced” a couple of years back, so it’s a big deal to me. I can’t believe 2 YEARS have passed since “Unlaced”! I’ve been insanely busy with life, and work, so it was fantastic to jump back into a film. No offense to our commercial and corporate video clients- we love you, too. But it’s good to stretch, and doing a film lets one scratch a certain itch one cannot otherwise scratch.

So, here’s how it happened- I was in New York, and after a series of really swell meetings with clients, I had some downtime. I also had my RED Dragon, a few lenses, one light (a VisualBuddha LED), and a newly-purchased DJI Ronin. I also had my NYC apartment, and Manhattan. Most importantly, however, I had my friend and former costar of “Unlaced” in town- Joanne Ryan!

I sat down, and figured out a story that I could shoot, based around these resources. I wrote a script, and sent it to my LA writer’s group. After some great feedback, I decided- what the hell. Let’s make a movie!

It was a fantastic experience. First, Joanne and I got Broadway and Television actor Sean McDermott to play the male lead. He’s wonderful! And I know I’ll work with him again. Second, I called up my buddies Chad and Jason, and begged them to crew the film for me. They agreed, we found an excellent NYC makeup artist Lani Barry, and we were off to the races.

NY Loves Film was truly helpful in securing locations and answering questions I had (this was my very first real film in NYC, after all), and the City of New York also really helped us out. Despite 30 degree (15 degree windchill) days, and one weather delay, it all came together gloriously, and I’m really excited to get into post production on this one.

I’ll post a lot more about the film later on, but right now I’m in post on a client project in LA, and they have a very quick turnaround on their project. Thank you to all who helped on this one- you guys are my go-tos, now!

About PatrickOrtman, Inc.

PatrickOrtman, Inc. is one of the top-rated video production companies in Los Angeles and New York City. We make high-end corporate videos, and commercials for TV and digital for clients that include 11 Fortune 500s.