Corporate Video Production

14Jan

Should you work with a video agency or a video production company?

A bunch of people wonder why I call our company a video agency, as opposed to a video production company. It’s an excellent question.

I’ve found that there’s not a whole lot of video production companies that can really guide a client from the very beginnings of a project through completion and distribution strategies.   Straight-up video production companies are really good at execution, if your idea is pretty well-developed. But that doesn’t happen very often. That’s where we come in. We’re a full-service video storytelling firm, and we’re as interested in working with our clients’  stories as we are about flawlessly executing them.

It comes down to a willingness to work with a client to help develop their story. Then execution. And after that, helping clients find ways to promote and expose their stories to their audiences. What we provide is a 360 degree service, much like how a traditional advertising agency will often work with a client. Thus, our moniker “video agency”.

 

2Jan

2012 in Review

2013

Happy 2013! We hope this year brings you peace, happiness, and success. And yes, you guessed it- this is another “Year in Review” post.  Here’s some of our 2012 highlights:

  • We were pleased to add a Fortune 50 client (PepsiCo) to our already stellar Fortune 500 client list, with our well-received short film about PepsiCo’s amazing CEO Indra Nooyi.
  • Our client UCLA worked with us to create the first college promotional film shot entirely on an iPad. It turned out surprisingly well.
  • UCLA also partnered with us to create another well-received short film about legendary basketball coach and leader John Wooden.
  • Oxford University Press continued to work with us, and we shot video interviews and other material for a documentary on Los Angeles food truck culture.
  • We got to interview and video a number of other interesting and often high-profile people in 2012, including Taco Bell CEO Greg Creed (he’s an excellent interview, by the way). And we’re proud of the web promos, TV commercials, and corporate video production work we created for our technology, legal, and other clients this past year. Thank you all for your patronage.
  • On a more personal note, we finished production and post production on Patrick’s short drama “Unlaced”. It’s about a man whose life has come undone, and was shot in glorious widescreen on RED digital cinema cameras. It looks amazing, and begins showing at film festivals this fall.

2012 was a year of growth and tons of great video production projects for cool clients. Cheers to an even better 2013!

16Nov

Latest Press Release: Video Agency PatrickOrtman, Inc. delivers for UCLA’s John Wooden Global Leadership Awards

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) November 16, 2012

Video director and filmmaker Patrick Ortman created two films for UCLA’s annual John Wooden Global Leadership Awards last week in Beverly Hills.

The first film honored coach John Wooden’s storied life, including his amazing feats of success as a coach, and his philosophy for a successful life- his influential Pyramid of Success. The film also introduced the three Wooden Fellows from UCLA’s Anderson School of Management, each of whom embody Coach Wooden’s values.

The second film honored Indra Nooyi, PepsiCo’s Chairman and CEO and the 2012 recipient of the John Wooden Global Leadership Award. It celebrated her life story, from her early days in India through her professional career, culminating with her Performance with Purpose, Pepsico’s promise to do what’s right for the business by doing what’s right for people and the planet. It included interviews with colleagues such as Taco Bell CEO Greg Creed, and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.

UCLA’s Britt Benston, Director of Creative Services for UCLA Anderson School of Management, says “When I knew this would be a full-service, multifaceted request –with last-minute demands– there was no question about going with Patrick on this. Patrick can do it all: produce, direct, shoot, edit, create motion graphics, do the audio mix in ProTools, mastering, and more. He’s everything in a single resource. On top of that, he produced these challenging short films with soul and artistry. He would not sacrifice quality at any turn. As a reward, the piece earned multiple compliments and inquiries from members of our C-level audience.”

PatrickOrtman, Inc. is an award-winning Los Angeles, California video agency and corporate video production company, with clients ranging from the Fortune 500 to new tech startups in the USA and UK. The company’s website is http://www.patrickortman.com

11Nov

What Is A Video Agency?

Over the past several years we’ve rapidly left behind any new business that isn’t related to video production, and we’ve brought in substantial and ongoing investment in tools and techniques that have helped us create award-winning videos for our clients, successful web series and mobile-oriented video properties, and best-of-class multi-platform video campaigns. It’s the way of the world- professionals specialize. We’ve become solely focused on delivering great video to clients, and maximizing their video’s reach. We’ve become, in short, a video agency.

But what, exactly, is a video agency? And why should one hire such an entity?

Rob David from mega-advertising agency Ogilvy wrote:
“It is unreasonable to expect brands to have a fluid understanding of the advanced video marketplace. The changes come too fast and new opportunities open on the fly. A Video Agency of Record not only brings a brand the best of the current landscape, but positions them for the ever-changing but increasingly disciplined road ahead. ”

And that’s exactly what we’re all about. We are video specialists- we know the web, we know video, and we know how to make the most of a client’s video efforts from a strategic point of view as well as the creative and technical points of view. A great video agency helps you cut through the noise, enhances your brand, and helps drive traffic to your website.

Now, why not call ourselves a video production company, one may ask. Simple- because to us a video agency is more than a video production company. To us, the words “video production company”  conjure up visions of antiquated broadcast-only projects with limited vision. A video agency is the fast adapting, leading-edge mammal to the corporate video production dinosaur.

A video agency delivers far more bang for the buck. We give you the sizzle and the steak, and we make old-fashioned corporate video look, well, really old-fashioned. In addition to knowing how to create great video, we know how to position your video efforts for today’s landscape, and that ever-changing road ahead.

26Oct

Does Your Company Video Evoke Strong Emotion?

If you’re hoping for your latest content to go viral, it has to do one thing: evoke strong emotion.
– Scott Stratton, Fast Company

Audiences expect quality these days. I’m not just talking about production quality, although in many cases that’s quite important. I’m also talking about the quality of your video’s story. Does your video even tell a story? If it does, is the story simple, honest, and direct? And does it appeal, on an emotional level, to your audience?

Video can be incredibly powerful, it’s the most effective way to intimately connect, to convey ideas and get your message across. But video has to be done right to be effective, and even more so if you wish the video (or better yet, the ideas you’ve presented in your video) to go viral.

These days, even corporate videos are expected to evoke emotion and tell a story. The old ways just don’t work anymore, audiences are more sophisticated and have higher expectations. And it doesn’t matter if your audience is the general public or your employees at a sales meeting. If you don’t work hard to tell your story in a way that grabs them, you’ve lost them.

 

 

24Oct

All Push and No Play Makes You a Dull Person

Google expects their people to spend 20% of their time working on pet projects. That’s a whole day a week. It’s a really great idea, and not just because it often results in new products and services for Google to offer the world. It also makes for better performance at one’s “day job”. Google’s not the only big company pushing the idea of encouraging their people to spend time working on projects not directly related to their “real jobs”, either. 3M’s been doing it since forever. And they brought us post-its, so you know they’re onto something.

That insistence on working on pet projects and playtime gets me thinking about our business, the business of video & film production. Often there’s not enough playfulness involved- I know a ton of talented guys who spend all their time going from video production gig to video production gig. Never resting. Never tinkering with pet projects. I’ve watched a lot of them get burned out, and most of them fall into a rut, where their videos get stuck at a certain quality level and never progress to the next level.

I really believe that all push and no play makes one a dull person. That’s why we’re always working on a couple side projects while we do our paid projects. It makes our paid work better, and it makes us more well-rounded people. Sometimes, it even opens our minds to new ways of doing things.

 

15Oct

The Biggest Secret to a Successful TV Commercial

We do a lot of local and regional TV commercials, along with the occasional national spot, and we’ve won a ton of awards for some really good work we’ve done in that space. After working with a variety of clients from the Fortune 500 to Mom-and-Pops, it’s become painfully obvious: the reason many spots just don’t work is a total lack of focus and the absence of a solid concept.

Conversely, if you create a local TV commercial that has a strong concept and message, one that’s focused and not scattered, you’re miles ahead of the competition.

And that’s all I have to say about that.

 

8Oct

Five Tips to Produce Quality Video for the Web

We do a lot of broadcast video and corporate films, but we also do a fair amount of video designed for the web. So I’ve learned a few things about how to do web video right.

Web Video Tip #1: If you’re still shooting using interlaced video- stop that! You shouldn’t be shooting interlaced anymore, anyway, unless you’re shooting sports videos. Even corporate videos deserve progressive-scan video signals, and web videos look a ton better when you get rid of that ugly “1980s” look by shooting with a camera that can shoot progressive, not interlaced.

Web Video Tip #2: Shoot to deliver your video at 24p. It looks way more filmic and cool.

Web Video Tip #3: If you’re going for a cinematic quality (and you should be, to stand out), try to minimize shaky camera moves. They scream “cheap amateur”. This is why you invest in things like tripods, dollies, and Steadicams.

Web Video Tip #4: Make sure you expose properly! You have no idea how much crappy video we see, here. Usually we’re asked if we can fix it. If the video involves blown-out highlights, we can’t fix it at all. Some places to watch for blown out video: foreheads of men. Noses. Anything that gets too shiny when you shoot. And yes, some video has blown out backgrounds. That’s usually not so bad, it doesn’t look as amateurish as blown out faces.

Web Video Tip #5: Audio quality matters! If you can’t use a dedicated soundman, then at least record with lavaliere microphones and listen to the audio as it’s being laid down. Ideally, you’ll be recording into a separate audio system. Why? Because most cameras’ onboard audio sucks. Sometimes, we run a mike into the camera and still record a separate, higher-quality mike into our dedicated audio recorder. Then, in post we use software that automatically syncs the good audio to the camera audio. Then again, we almost always use a dedicated soundman, too.

Upon reflection, each these tips applies equally well to almost any kind of video you create, if you’re going for a quality look for your message. But many companies and organizations don’t put as much thought into creating a web video as they do when creating, say, a corporate film or a TV commercial. As the web becomes the dominant medium in our culture, learning to do your web video correctly will help you stand out, and give your message the best chance possible of connecting with people.

5Oct

What’s a Minute of Video Worth?

According to Dr. James McQuivey of Forrester research (and really, he’d know, right?), a minute of video is worth about 1.8 million words. That’s something like 36,000 web pages. It’s a stack of novels. It’s… well, it’s a lot.

I’m not sold on a minute of video being the equivalent of almost two million words. But a well-crafted video that really shows off your company is an incredibly smart investment. It makes sense- the average attention span of an adult is now hovering at around 8 seconds. What’s going to grab and maintain that interest- reading words, or watching a well-made video?  Video engages like nothing else: over 70% of consumers online watch online videos, and experts say that the amount of online traffic that’s video-related will jump to 90% by 2013.

That’s huge. You want a part of that for your business, right?

Now, for a company that wants to put its best foot forward and engage its customers, video’s a win. Pretty much everyone knows that. But a problem still remains- how do you stand out from the competition with your video? I have a few thoughts on that, but they’re for another post. Stay tuned!

© Copyright 2017. All Rights Reserved PatrickOrtman, Inc.