22Jan

To Thine Own Self, Be True. Mission Statement As Business Tool.

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We create exceptional films and videos for clients who “get it”.
– Mission Statement, PatrickOrtman, Inc.

In life as well as business, it’s vitally important to know who you are, and what you want. Or you’ll find yourself completely off-track, and miserable. That’s right- we all need that old business school mainstay, the mission statement.  I resisted the mission statement at first, but now that we have one, I find myself referring to it almost daily.

For instance, recently we got a video lead from a New York City advertising agency, for a tech startup client. I was flattered they’d found us, and wanted to work with the agency. There was one thing- the budget they’d proposed was a bit low. Still, wanting to work with the agency, I entertained the idea of the project, and talked with them about it. Things felt very positive, initially.

Then, more red flags went up- after spending some time talking with the agency, they told me the client wanted an even smaller budget. And then told me they were talking to other video companies, and wanted to pick my brain and “see what you can offer” before making a decision. Meaning, they wanted to play us off other companies to beat us up on price, and they wanted us to do spec work- to work up creative concepts for the project, for free.

Spec work is evil. They wanted our ideas- our creativity, which of course is what we sell- for nothing, and they wanted us to do the actual project for even less than the already pitiful budget they’d proposed.

In the past, I may have tried to make it work. I know a lot of people in the video production industry bow down to demands like this all the time. But, I’ve been there. I know that when a project starts with the other guy kicking you, it won’t end well, either.

My company creates exceptional films and videos for clients who “get it”. We don’t work for free, we don’t compete on price, and we don’t suffer clients who are cheap bastards, shitheads, or idiots. We’re among the best in the world at what we do, and I make no apologies for saying that- it’s the truth. This particular client clearly did not “get it”, and therefore failed our “mission statement” test.

I think the agency was rather surprised, and I know we may never work together now. But that’s OK- working under their requirements would mean they’d always see us as “the cheap guys” and “the desperate guys”, and every future project would be a terrible experience. Life’s too short. Pass!

Learning to say no and pass on bad projects is as important as landing the good ones. For me, my company’s heard-earned mission statement has proved vital in separating the good from the bad. Deciding to work or not with a client is a complicated dance. Having a solid sense of who you are and what you’re about is a fantastic tool to help you concentrate your efforts on the good ones. So, thanks business school. Turns out you weren’t useless after all.

 

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